Change Is Good or Bad

Global warming is not a problem but fear of it is. Climate change can be a problem but that’s what climate does–it changes and that is natural–all we can do is prepare for it. The fear about climate change, however, is a symptom of a big problem.

Although the Earth is in no danger from man Western civilization is certainly falling down: the foundation is crumbling, society is rotting from the inside out, and there is nothing important to hold the system together because values are shot so truth is dead. And, the new economic reality that America must now live with is a fall of productivity due to a rise in government-sponsored prejudice and discrimination against the productive.

What American society faces and will be shaped by in the future is the government’s use of global warming alarmism to consolidate power through internal disintegration of identity and by the pathological perpetuation of hatred of business and capitalism. The government’s promotion of prejudice and discrimination against the productive–a group comprised of workers and entrepreneurs in the free enterprise sector–and the government’s creation of negative stereotypes and fear of Americanism and defining as the common enemy those espousing patriotism, nationalism and Judeo-Christian ideals is no change for the better.

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About Wagathon

Hot World Syndrome—fear of a hotter, more intimidating world than it actually is prompting a desire for more protection than is warranted by any actual threat. A Chance Meeting– We toured south along the Bicentennial Bike Trail in the Summer of 1980, working up appetites covering ~70 miles per day and staying at hiker/biker campgrounds at night along the Oregon/California coast (they were 50¢ a day at that time). The day's ride over, and after setting up tents, hitting the showers, and making a run to a close-by store, it was time to relax. The third in our little bicycle tour group, Tom, was about 30 yards away conversing with another knot of riders and treating himself to an entire cheesecake for dinner. He probably figured Jim and I would joke about what a pig he was eating that whole pie and decided to eat among strangers. Three hours later after sharing stories and remarking on a few coincidences that turned up here and there, Tom and one of the former strangers realized they were cousins, meeting in this most unlikely place for the first time. ~Mac
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